public relations

Women in Business – Women’s History Month

 

Women in business2We are at the end of Women’s History Month. La Voz Marketing is a woman-owned firm, and we pride ourselves in how far women have come in the world of public relations and marketing. Business isn’t just a “man’s world” anymore – we are making our own footsteps. According to All Business Schools, as of 2015, women make up 60% of Bachelor’s and Master’s Degree recipients, and 44% of master’s degrees in business and management (including 37% of MBAs). To celebrate Women’s History Month, we would like to take the time to remember and celebrate some of the business milestones made by women throughout history. Here are a few:

1914-1918 – During World War I, women took on many industry and public service jobs, expanding increasing the views of what women could do. This was important because these advancements lead to increased support for women’s suffrage.

1920 – Congress passed the 19th Amendment, guaranteeing women the right to vote.

1939-1945 – During World War II, millions of women filled the job positions left behind by men that went to fight in the war. Women worked in defense plants, factories and more, acquiring more skills and opportunities.

1963 – Katharine Graham takes control as the President of The Washington Post. She becomes CEO of the paper in 1973, making her the first female Fortune 500 CEO.

1999 – Carly Fiorina became the first woman to lead a Fortune 50 company when she took control of Hewlett-Packard.

2013 – General Motors named Mary Barra CEO, making her the first female CEO of a major automaker.

According to Business Insider, women make up about 47% of the workforce, but only hold 14% of executive positions in Fortune 500 companies. Women also own about 40% of businesses. We have come far in history, but still have a long way to go in the business world.

For more information about our woman-owned business, and information about startups, contact us at info@lavozmarketing.com

 

Six Things to Consider When Working with Bloggers

IMG_0313 HPRA

La Voz Marketing recently attended the HPRA: PR + Bloggers event in Downtown Los Angeles. Three successful bloggers shared their experience working with PR professionals. Here are six key takeaways:

  • Do not ask bloggers to promote something that was not agreed upon
    Bloggers have worked hard to build their following. They won’t put anything out there that doesn’t resonate with them or their audience.
  • Avoid providing bloggers with scripted messages
    Bloggers have already developed their voice and personal brand. They know how to leverage their social media channels to get the results that you want.
  • Stop using the term “Mommy Bloggers”
    It was suggested that PR professionals stop using the term “mommy bloggers” because it annoys bloggers. Click here to see some of the reasons why they dislike it.
  • Mom bloggers aren’t the only ones with influence over children
    PR professionals put so much emphasis on working with mom bloggers, but they are missing out on other key influencers. There are various female bloggers, especially Latina bloggers, who have influences as a tía (aunt), a madrina (godmother), and a hermana mayor (older sister).
  • Latinos are outnumbering the general market
    The Latino market in Los Angeles is becoming the general market. Keep this in mind when you build your next communications campaign. You need to find the right blogger that can cross over naturally by speaking to an audience versus speaking at an audience. This rule applies to all cultures and backgrounds, but it’s emphasized because it usually doesn’t happen when marketing to the Latino audience.
  • If you invite a blogger to an event, be there
    One of the bloggers shared a horror story about a company treating her wrong during a live streaming attempt. The client/company did not understand the value of the blogger’s physical and online presence. As a result, the company lost business and respect from some of her 45.8K Twitter followers. Bloggers highly recommend a PR professional to be present at the event for additional support.

If you are handling your marketing efforts in-house, we hope you keep these points in mind!  For assistance with blogger outreach, feel free to contact La Voz Marketing.

 

A Lesson Learned from the Guy Having Coffee With all of His Facebook friends

Coffee Meeting

Matt Kulesza has 1,088 Facebook friends.  When he was skimming through his Facebook friends to delete people he does not talk to or know, he came up with an idea that has transformed into an approximate three year project and popular blog.  Matt has embarked on a journey to meet up for coffee with all 1,088 Facebook friends.  Without intentionally trying to, Matt has reminded us the importance of connecting with others in-person.  Social media and emails are important, but good public relations professionals do not hide behind the computer.  An in-person get together provides an opportunity to learn about each other on a personal and professional level.  The influencer might share with you several story ideas he/she is working on or you may spark an idea for a future story.  The influencer might utilize your brand’s thought leader for a story, after hearing about his/her impact in the industry.  Relationships are sacred and are best built in-person.  Keeping up with a person online is beneficial, but nothing can replace that in-person connection.

Check out Matt Kulesza’s efforts on his blog, 1000+ Coffees.

 

 

The Future of Marketing and Public Relations

future image

 

In a recent Fast Company article, Jarone Ashkenazi discusses the future of public relations and its changing landscape in today’s business world.  Prior to the internet, public relations used to operate under the filter down theory and public relations practitioners relied on traditional media to get the word out.  In today’s world, public relations, marketing and social media are interdependent on each other and a brand and its audience communicate in a dialogue.   Although the storytelling aspect remains the same, measuring the tactics’ effects on sales and marketing goals is more critical than measuring impressions solely.

The future of public relations and marketing will have a huge effect on a brand if practitioners do not adapt to today’s business world.  In line with the article, La Voz Marketing recommends the following tactics to help your brand adapt to the future of marketing and public relations:

  • Write your brand’s story

Many brands have the opportunity to share their story through various online channels such as websites, blogs and social media.  Although engaging influencers and pitching news outlets is still important, you do not have to wait for someone else to share your story.  A google search that directs consumers to a problem-solving product that your brand offers will drive conversions.

  • Monitor all of your brand’s conversations online and offline

Listen to the conversations your audience is having about your brand.  You will learn about the positive aspects and things you need to improve.  A crisis can be avoided by simply listening.  Monitoring the conversations may also lead to a potential story idea for your brand’s blog and influencers.

  • Join your audience on new social networks

If your audience is active on a new social network, your brand should join the conversation.  It will help your brand in the long run.  However, we do not recommend for that you join every new social network.

  • Provide an opportunity for your audience to collaborate on content creation

A collaborative effort of content creation will engage your consumers and allow them to become a part of your brand.  For example, Doritos created the $1M Doritos Super Bowl ad contest which encouraged consumers to create a Doritos ad for the opportunity to be shown at the Super Bowl.  Besides impressing the Doritos execs, the $1M Doritos Super Bowl ad was chosen by the general public.

  • Demonstrate your brand’s value to your audience

At the end of the day, your brand must demonstrate value to your consumers.  People are utilizing and will continue to purchase your product if it’s value is demonstrated consistently.  When brand trust is proven, consumers will recommend your product to others.

OC/PRSA 10th Annual Diversity Forum

DIVERSITY_10_Anniversary2-e1405743367778-300x282Last week we attended the OC/PRSA 10th Annual Diversity Forum, hosted by the OC/PRSA Diversity committee. At this luncheon, approximately 40 public relations, marketing and journalism practitioners listened to leading diversity practitioners share information about the progress made and what can be done to improve diversity in the workplace and the marketplace.

Moderator Richard Chang of the OC Register kicked off the discussion with Orange County Census statistics and shared that Orange County is a “majority minority city”.  Chang said public relations practitioners, journalists and marketers share something in common: “We are all trying to reach audiences.” He also stressed that we must be “very thoughtful on who we are trying to reach.”

Joe Keenan of MWW began his presentation by sharing the differences of traditional and current marketing strategies to the LGBT community.  Ads that would not have been created in years past are now running and reflect the New America.  Blurred lines exist in marketing to this coveted audience.

Lynn Jolliffe of Ingram Micro showcased how the company’s diversity objectives and strategies have increased diversity within the company.  Diversity is a component of the company’s corporate social responsibility and the company is attracting top talent because of it.  Lynn Jolliffe’s work at Ingram Micro provides an excellent model for other companies who are looking to increase their diversity.

Anne Dean, APR of Education Management Corporation, introduced statistics that will comprise 2020’s workforce and indicate the racial ethnic diversity in America.  Although racial ethnic diversity is on the rise, progress is limited for Hispanics and African Americans due to a lack of resources and lowered standards in education.  Dean stated that education drives diversity in professions and encouraged listeners to donate or offer resources to organizations that promote education equality.

La Voz Marketing congratulates the OC/PRSA Diversity Committee on its 10th anniversary and its success in the PRSA community.  We look forward to attending the next OC/PRSA diversity event.  For more information about OC/PRSA diversity events, visit http://www.ocprsa.org/programs-events/diversity/.

 

Media Relations Tips For Any Sized Business

journalist

Media relations is beneficial for any business, no matter its size.  Journalists are always looking for story ideas that will benefit their readers and media placements can help showcase your business as an expert or resource.  Below are media relations tips for businesses that are looking to increase their awareness.

1) Monitor the News.  By reading or watching the news, you become aware of topics that journalists like to cover.  In addition, you may spot an opportunity to newsjack or insert a company opinion about a trending topic.  Google Alerts allow consumers to receive news alerts based on their chosen keyword and Google Trends showcases the latest searched topics.  These tools keep you proactive in finding a story to pitch.

2) Pitch a story idea based on a timely event of public interest.  If you track upcoming events or holidays occurring in your community, your business may find an opportunity to pitch a relevant story idea.  For example, around mid-August and early September, many back to school stories appear on the news.  If your company relates to this season, you can integrate your company in a back to school story idea.

3) Be the Journalist’s Assistant.  After the journalist confirms his or her interest in writing the story, assist the journalist by providing the information he or she needs and coordinating the interviews.  A journalist will remember the work you put in to help the story get published.

4) Show Gratitude. Thank the journalist for the story.  Let him/her know that you appreciate his or her work.  Gratitude goes a long way and journalists will remember you the next time you pitch a story.

 

What are you waiting for? Develop a Connection with Hispanic Millennials.

Hispanic Millennials

Brands should invest marketing dollars in Hispanic Millennials.   A Telemundo Case Study called “Who is the New America” reveals that there are 50 million Hispanics in the United States that possess $1 trillion of disposable income in total.  They outspend Non-Hispanics in electronics, clothing, beauty products, CDs, and groceries.  Latino Millennials currently make up 46% of the Hispanic population and are members of the fastest growing demographic in the United States.

To connect with the Hispanic millennial, brands must understand how they like to communicate and their passion points. Approximately 64% of the Latino youth are Spanish dominant/bilingual and connect emotionally with Spanish or ‘Spanglish” messaging.  A Nielsen, Univision Communications and Starcom Media Vest Group study, “The Bilingual Brain”, found Spanish Ads to be more effective in driving emotional engagement and memory activation than their English counterparts.  The Hispanic millennials in the study were more engaged with a Spanglish Ad following English programming in comparison to Spanglish ads following Spanish programming.

When creating brand messaging, marketers need to look beyond simply translating an English message.  Instead, they should focus on the fact that historical context and cognitive abilities play an influential role in how Hispanics perceive an advertisement.

LVM provides insight to its clients on the Hispanic millennial ‘voz’ or voice and helps them identify brand-specific passion points that will engage this growing audience.  Through experience, we know that Hispanic millennials are receptive to brand messaging when communicated in the right way.

OC Public Relations Society of America Receives 2013 Diversity Award

The Orange County Chapter of the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) has been recognized for embodying and demonstrating key values in diversity with the 2013 Chapter Diversity Award.

OCPRSA_logoThe award, presented at the PRSA 2013 International Conference Diversity Mixer in Philadelphia, is given to individual PRSA Chapters that exhibit diversity and represent movement to the betterment of diversity. By recognizing efforts of the Chapter, the award also contributes to advancing diversity.

Contributing to the OC Chapter’s success was this years 9th Annual Diversity Forum, which took place this past September. The event was titled “Don’t Get Lost in Translation: How to Decipher Cultural and Generational Shifts” and acted as a development resource to educate both student and professional PR specialists regarding diversity initiatives and best practices.  The event was moderated by Los Angeles Times reporter Anh Do, known for her coverage of multicultural communities. Other speakers included executives and business leaders in their field who spoke of their involvement in the outreach of growing cultural diversity.

La Voz Marketing proudly congratulates its local chapter OCPRSA on this important recognition!  PRSA is the largest professional organization serving the U.S. public relations community. Their mission is to “advance the profession and the professional” by providing news and information, continuing education and networking opportunities.  At La Voz Marketing, we strongly believe in the business value of Public Relations, advocate for greater diversity among our fellow professionals, and support our clients in developing and executing diversity initiatives through our multicultural marketing expertise.