CEO

Women in Business – Women’s History Month

 

Women in business2We are at the end of Women’s History Month. La Voz Marketing is a woman-owned firm, and we pride ourselves in how far women have come in the world of public relations and marketing. Business isn’t just a “man’s world” anymore – we are making our own footsteps. According to All Business Schools, as of 2015, women make up 60% of Bachelor’s and Master’s Degree recipients, and 44% of master’s degrees in business and management (including 37% of MBAs). To celebrate Women’s History Month, we would like to take the time to remember and celebrate some of the business milestones made by women throughout history. Here are a few:

1914-1918 – During World War I, women took on many industry and public service jobs, expanding increasing the views of what women could do. This was important because these advancements lead to increased support for women’s suffrage.

1920 – Congress passed the 19th Amendment, guaranteeing women the right to vote.

1939-1945 – During World War II, millions of women filled the job positions left behind by men that went to fight in the war. Women worked in defense plants, factories and more, acquiring more skills and opportunities.

1963 – Katharine Graham takes control as the President of The Washington Post. She becomes CEO of the paper in 1973, making her the first female Fortune 500 CEO.

1999 – Carly Fiorina became the first woman to lead a Fortune 50 company when she took control of Hewlett-Packard.

2013 – General Motors named Mary Barra CEO, making her the first female CEO of a major automaker.

According to Business Insider, women make up about 47% of the workforce, but only hold 14% of executive positions in Fortune 500 companies. Women also own about 40% of businesses. We have come far in history, but still have a long way to go in the business world.

For more information about our woman-owned business, and information about startups, contact us at info@lavozmarketing.com

 

Use Snapchat to Attract Millennials and Centennials

Snapchat

Snapchat is a mobile app that allows users to view images and videos that disappear after displaying for up to 10 seconds. According to GWI, Snapchat was the fastest growing social app in 2014 with over 100 million daily active users.

Marketers have been struggling to target Millennials through various mediums, primarily due to the lack of targeting and understanding of specific subgroups. Recently, marketers have sought ways to target Centennials, also known as Generation Z, who currently make up more than 25% of the U.S. population. Here are a few statistics that demonstrate why Snapchat is the perfect social media platform to attract both groups:

  •   71% of Snapchat users are under 25 years old
  •   77% of college students use Snapchat daily
  •   30% of U.S. millennial internet users access Snapchat regularly
  •   34% of 18-34 year olds in the U.S. have a Snapchat account
  •   32% of teens (13-17) use Snapchat

If that doesn’t convince you, a recent study by Mashable shows a lot of opportunities for companies to expose their brand to college students. Here were some key findings:

  •   45% of college students would open a Snapchat from a brand they don’t know
  •   73% of college students would open a Snapchat from a brand they do know
  •   67% of college students would want to receive discounts or promotions from brands on Snapchat
  •   58% of college students are likely to purchase a brand’s product or service if they send them a Snapchat coupon

Although this data shows that Millennials and Centennials are frequent Snapchat users, only 1% of marketers use Snapchat. Brands that are afraid to experiment with new social media platforms are making a big mistake.

Wet Seal, for example, stepped outside the norm by hiring a 16-year old to manage their Snapchat account. Within two days, the brand had 9,000 new followers and 6,000 views of Wet Seal’s Snapchat “story.”

At the end of the day, brands should not be afraid to use Snapchat, especially since Snapchat’s CEO is a Millennial himself!

Invest in Your Internal Brand

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Once you have budget to invest in your brand, you may be wondering if it is best spent on a local television commercial or an ad on YouTube. Instead, we encourage you to consider investing in your people!

Google, for example, has spent little on advertising and more on its employer brand. Its main focus is on getting and retaining the best employees, knowing customers will follow. Google invests in its people and its “People” team by paying some of the highest salaries, giving out the best perks and having the most stringent hiring process. As a result, its team morale improves, workers are engaged and there is less turnover. In addition, Google employees brag about the investment, which is organic marketing at its finest.

AETNA, the health insurance company, offers another great example of a company investing in its employees. On April 30th, AETNA announced a raise to its lowest-paid workers to $16 an hour.  Mark Bertolini, CEO of AETNA, believes the raise could pay for itself by causing workers to be more productive. Approximately 5,700 employees will be affected by this pay raise, including people who have made ends meet by seeking public assistance such as food stamps or Medicaid for their children. Although some people are skeptical about this tactic, Bertolini stays firm in his belief that it is the right thing to do and many people agree.

A few weeks before AETNA’s announcement, Gravity Payments’ CEO Dan Price also gave his employees a pay raise.  He cut about 90% from his salary, nearly $1 million, and gave it to his employees. Not only is he getting widespread media attention for the pay raise and his sacrifice, but he is developing a stronger company culture.

LVM hopes that you find these stories inspiring! Investing in your internal brand is a new way to think about branding and a great way to improve the lives of your employees. For more information about branding, contact us at info@lavozmarketing.com.