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A Reflection of 2012 from a Latino Perspective

Latino PerspectiveThe “Decade of the Latino” has arrived and historic events in 2012 illustrated that Latinos have spoken loud and clear. So what was learned in 2012 that will propel Latinos into 2013? Latin Heat Entertainment reflects on the past and forecasts what the second largest population in the U.S. can expect in the future.

Latinos were “listened to” and definitely “counted” when President Barack Obama was re-elected into the White House. Now with an additional four years, Obama promises immigration will be a top priority, but many questions need to be addressed, beginning with “how do we secure our borders, yet ensure international commerce that is vital to America?”

Unless they make an effort to address the disparities, the Democrats could lose in California and Texas due to the GOP’s recent increase of elected Latinos into visible positions (Governor, U.S. Senator). In California, Latinos comprise 40 percent of the population, yet have no statewide elected officials. In fact, two years ago, state Democrats voted not to endorse any Latino candidate running for statewide office and the California Democratic Party leadership does not include any Latinos.

Another thing 2012 taught us was that polls and data sets are essential to be a part of mainstream media news. As voter projections were made, more and more Latino “experts” were guests on a variety of political talk shows. For example, Spanish news broadcaster Jorge Ramos asked tough questions to both the two Presidential candidates, proving that Latinos are attune to the issues facing America. Some of these issues include poverty numbers between 25 and 28 percent and an unemployment rate of 10 percent.

What Latinos can expect, beginning in 2013, is more inclusion, especially in mainstream media. For instance, Giselle Fernandez, the only Latina on The Kennedy Center Honors’ Board of Trustees, is heading up a committee to revamp the honorees selection process and be more inclusive of Latino artists. The challenge will be the sensitizing of Hollywood, in which films cast a white male actor to portray a Mexican American character.

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